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policymic:

Beautiful portraits showcase hidden queer Muslim identities

For years, Samra Habib kept relatively quiet when it came to her identity. It can be hard for LGBT Muslims to find acceptance in a community that does not hold consistently tolerant views on same-sex equality.

But Habib will stay say silent no longer. Picking up her camera, the young photographer has begun an “aesthetically engaging” and “culturally demanding” project designed to finally bring needed visibility of the queer Muslim community to the world.

"Just Me and Allah" is a photography project originally created on Tumblr, but which will be in exhibition at a handful of locations in Toronto — the Canadian Lesbian & Gay Archives, Videofag Gallery and Parliament Street Library — in conjunction with WorldPride, beginning June 20.

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juke243:

Classic Cult Movies Wardrobes by Candice Milon. Originally featured in the French publication Sport & Style, she unmistakably captures the essence of each movie by using their iconic wardrobes in these beautiful framed shots. Whether it’s a bowler hat and white slacks set against an orange background or some red Hi-tops with matching gilet and skate board lit against a subtle grey backdrop, these images of color and costume pay tribute to everyone’s favorite cinematic moments.

1. Back to the Future
2. Casablanca
3. The Blues Brothers
4. Forrest Gump
5. A Clockwork Orange
6. Rebel Without a Cause

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vaganja:

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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Malcolm Venville. The Women of Casa X.

The British photographer Malcolm Venville has made a searing photographic record of a deranged reality. Complementing Venville’s photographs is a series of astonishingly candid interviews with the women of Casa X by the well-known Mexican writer Amanda de la Rosa. These are the portraits and testimonies of thirty-five survivors of the monster of the City, with much to say about life in a slum in Latin America: about the Mexico that horrifies, about sex, poverty, love, and the darkest side of human nature.

One night in Mexico City, Carmen Muñoz, sex worker, was roaming the streets looking for customers. Unexpectedly, she found two colleagues, both over sixty years old, sleeping on the street, covered by newspapers. After almost forty years of giving service to butchers, porters, refuse collectors and criminals, they were now long forgotten by their families and society. Carmen was confronted with what would be her own fate, like most women of her profession. Striving for dignity for all of them, she organised her colleagues and led a group that resolved to find a home where they could spend their last days in safety and warmth.

In 2006, after twelve years of work, and with the support of Mexican intellectuals and artists, the government gave them a seventeenth-century mansion, where Carmen founded Casa Xochiquetzal - Casa X. Around sixty women, all over fifty years old, receive shelter, food, and medical and psychological care. This is not just a retirement home - most of the women who live there still walk the streets. But Casa X is the only refuge for prostitutes in Latin America.

Casa X is located in the heart of the notorious district of Tepito. Although only eight blocks from the historic centre of Mexico City, Tepito is a micro-universe, where life is lived in a unique fashion. For nearly 500 years it has been a place of impunity, crime, smuggling, violence and prostitution. The neighbourhood did not submit to the Aztec Empire, or to the Spanish conquistadors, or to the current authorities. Tepito has an identity that goes beyond its boundaries. It has its own social organisation, myths, heroes, slang, and even its own local deity, La Santa Muerte (Holy Death). The women of Casa X are stuck at the bottom of the ladder of this world, and keeping the memories of it in their bodies.

Website

Bodies!!!!

this is amazingly beautiful.

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graciehagen:

cry·ing  /ˈkrī-iNG/ - the act is defined as a complex secretomotor phenomenon characterized by the shedding of tears from the lacrimal apparatus, without any irritation of the ocular structures.

  In an age where nudity is less vulnerable than genuine emotions, I wanted to explore an aspect of peoples lives that are hidden.
  These are the faces of the intentionally vulnerable. They’re showing you a part of themselves that is usually saved for their loved ones or even sometimes, just themselves.
  You don’t know why they are crying, but you know that this is a rare look into a stranger’s most personal moments.
  Things that were private, now made public.
Secretomotor Phenomenon series by Gracie Hagen